Victorian Cooking…Orange Fritters

Orange Fritters

Mix two tablespoonfuls of flour smoothly with one well-beaten egg, a quarter of an ounce of butter, and a quarter of a pint of cream, and add a pinch of salt and a dessert-spoonful of brandy.

Peel four or five large sweet oranges; take away the white pith, and divide them into sections without breaking the thin skin that divides them. Dip the pieces first into sherry, then into sifted sugar, and afterwards into the batter.

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Fry them in hot lard until they are lightly browned. Drain them on blotting paper to free them entirely from fat, and serve piled high on a hot napkin, with sifted sugar strewn over them. Time, eight or ten minutes to fry the oranges. Sufficient for four or five persons.

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This a tasty and easy recipe to follow and I added some Cinnamon…Highly recommended!

Shrove Tuesday Football…oh and pancakes!

Ahhh…Pancake Day!

Shrove Tuesday football was part of community celebrations for Shrove Tuesday in many towns. Kingston not far from where I live had the game but was eventually banned because of the damage and violence caused.

The Victorians pretty much killed it off when they the passed the Highway Act 1835 which banned playing football on public highways although there are some town that still have what is termed as ‘mob football’.

But of course we must not forget pancakes on what is generally known as ‘Pancake Day’, so it’s over to Mrs Beeton for her crepe recipe which is what a pancake essentially is:

Ingredients: 2 eggs, 2 oz of butter, 2 oz of sifted sugar, 2 oz of flour, 1/2 pint of new milk.

Mode: Beat the eggs thoroughly, and put them into a basin with the butter, which should be beaten to a cream; stir in the sugar and flour, and when these ingredients are well mixed, add the milk; keep stirring and beating the mixture for a few minutes; put it on buttered plates, and bake in a quick oven for 20 minutes. Serve with a cut lemon and sifted sugar, or pile the pancakes high on a dish, with a layer of preserve or marmalade between each. Sufficient for 3 or 4 persons.

Enjoy…!

Christmas Dinner recipes – Plum Pudding Recipe

These are a few menus for an authentic Victorian Christmas Dinner from Miss Leslie’s Lady’s New Receipt-book from 1850.

Christmas Dinner Recipe 1 

Boiled turkey with oyster sauce

Two roast geese with apple sauce

Roasted ham, Chicken pie

Stewed beets, cold-slaw, turnips, salsify*, winter-squash

Plum pudding, Mince pie, Lemon custards, cranberry pie.

Christmas Dinner Recipe 2

Roast turkey with cranberry sauce

Boiled fowls with celery sauce

Boiled ham, Goose pie

Turnips; Winter squash

Salsify, Cold slaw, Beets

Mince pudding boiled, Lemon pudding baked. Pumpkin pudding.

Christmas Dinner Recipe 3

Mock turtle soup

Roast Turkey with cranberry sauce

Boiled turkey with celery sauce, Roasted ham;
Smoked tongue, Chicken Curry, Oyster Pie

Beets; Cold-slaw, Winter-squash, salsify, Fried celery

Plum pudding, Mince pie, Calves’feet jelly, Blanc-mange.

So three 1850 menu’s, it’s give us something to think about as start to consider what we’ll cook for Christmas Day Dinner. Here’s a recipe to start us off.

A TEMPERANCE PLUM PUDDING

Take a pound of the best raisins, and cut them in half, after removing the seeds. Or use sultana raisins that have no seeds. Pick, and wash clean, a pound of currants, and dry them before the fire, spread out on a large flat dish.

Cut into slips half a pound of citron. Then mix together, on the same dish, the currants, the raisins, and the citron, and dredge them thickly with flour to prevent their sinking or clodding in the pudding; tumbling them about with your hands till they are all over well covered with the flour. Mince very fine a pound of beef suet.

Mix a pint of West India molasses with a pint of rich milk. Sift into a pan a pound of flour. In another pan beat eight eggs very light. Stir the beaten eggs, gradually, into the mixed molasses and milk ; alternately with the flour, and half a pound of sugar, (which should previously be crushed smooth by roiling it with a rolling-pin,) a little at a time of each. Then add, by degrees, the fruit and the suet, a little of each alternately.

Beat and stir the whole very hard, till all the ingredients are thoroughly mixed. Take a large clean square cloth of coarse strong linen, dip it in boiling water, shake it, spread it out in a large pan, and dredge it with flour to prevent the pudding from sticking to it when boiled. Then pour the pudding-mixture into the cloth ; leave room for it to swell, and tie it firmly, plastering up the tying-place with a bit of coarse dough made of flour and water. Have ready a large pot full of water, and boiling hard. Put in the pudding, and boil it well from six to eight hours. Less than six will not be sufficient, and eight hours will not be too long. Turn it several times while boiling, and keep at hand a kettle of hot water to replenish the pot as it boils away. Do not take it up till immediately before it is wanted on the table. Then dip it for a moment into cold water, untie the cloth, and turn out the pudding. Serve it up with a sauce-boat of sweetened cream, seasoned with nutmeg; or with butter and sugar beaten together till light and white, and flavoured with lemon. What is left of the pudding may be tied up in a cloth and boiled again next day for an hour or more. It will be equally as nice as on the first day. This is a much better way of re-cooking than to slice and fry it.

This pudding may be made with sifted yellow Indian meal, instead of wheat flour.

Christmas Dinner recipes – Plum Pudding Recipe

These are a few menus for an authentic Victorian Christmas Dinner from Miss Leslie’s Lady’s New Receipt-book from 1850.

Christmas Dinner Recipe 1 

Boiled turkey with oyster sauce

Two roast geese with apple sauce

Roasted ham, Chicken pie

Stewed beets, cold-slaw, turnips, salsify*, winter-squash

Plum pudding, Mince pie, Lemon custards, cranberry pie.

Christmas Dinner Recipe 2

Roast turkey with cranberry sauce

Boiled fowls with celery sauce

Boiled ham, Goose pie

Turnips; Winter squash

Salsify, Cold slaw, Beets

Mince pudding boiled, Lemon pudding baked. Pumpkin pudding.

Christmas Dinner Recipe 3

Mock turtle soup

Roast Turkey with cranberry sauce

Boiled turkey with celery sauce, Roasted ham;
Smoked tongue, Chicken Curry, Oyster Pie

Beets; Cold-slaw, Winter-squash, salsify, Fried celery

Plum pudding, Mince pie, Calves’feet jelly, Blanc-mange.

So three 1850 menu’s, it’s give us something to think about as start to consider what we’ll cook for Christmas Day Dinner. Here’s a recipe to start us off.

A TEMPERANCE PLUM PUDDING

Take a pound of the best raisins, and cut them in half, after removing the seeds. Or use sultana raisins that have no seeds. Pick, and wash clean, a pound of currants, and dry them before the fire, spread out on a large flat dish.

Cut into slips half a pound of citron. Then mix together, on the same dish, the currants, the raisins, and the citron, and dredge them thickly with flour to prevent their sinking or clodding in the pudding; tumbling them about with your hands till they are all over well covered with the flour. Mince very fine a pound of beef suet.

Mix a pint of West India molasses with a pint of rich milk. Sift into a pan a pound of flour. In another pan beat eight eggs very light. Stir the beaten eggs, gradually, into the mixed molasses and milk ; alternately with the flour, and half a pound of sugar, (which should previously be crushed smooth by roiling it with a rolling-pin,) a little at a time of each. Then add, by degrees, the fruit and the suet, a little of each alternately.

Beat and stir the whole very hard, till all the ingredients are thoroughly mixed. Take a large clean square cloth of coarse strong linen, dip it in boiling water, shake it, spread it out in a large pan, and dredge it with flour to prevent the pudding from sticking to it when boiled. Then pour the pudding-mixture into the cloth ; leave room for it to swell, and tie it firmly, plastering up the tying-place with a bit of coarse dough made of flour and water. Have ready a large pot full of water, and boiling hard. Put in the pudding, and boil it well from six to eight hours. Less than six will not be sufficient, and eight hours will not be too long. Turn it several times while boiling, and keep at hand a kettle of hot water to replenish the pot as it boils away. Do not take it up till immediately before it is wanted on the table. Then dip it for a moment into cold water, untie the cloth, and turn out the pudding. Serve it up with a sauce-boat of sweetened cream, seasoned with nutmeg; or with butter and sugar beaten together till light and white, and flavoured with lemon. What is left of the pudding may be tied up in a cloth and boiled again next day for an hour or more. It will be equally as nice as on the first day. This is a much better way of re-cooking than to slice and fry it.

This pudding may be made with sifted yellow Indian meal, instead of wheat flour.

Apples Snowball recipe

This wonderful desert comes from Mrs Beeton’s Book of Household Management Published in 1861 and is guide to all aspects of running a household in the Victorian Era.

Its 2751 entries from tips on how to deal with servants’ pay and children’s health, and above all a wealth of cooking advice, instructions and recipes. It was an immediate best-seller, running to millions of copies within just a few years.

Isabella was born at 24 Milk Street, Cheapside, London. She was sent to school in Heidelbergin Germany and afterward returned to her stepfather’s home in Epsom, not too far from me really…!

On a visit to London, she was introduced to Samuel Orchard Beeton, a publisher of books and popular magazines, they married on 10th July 1856.

Soon after she began to write articles on cooking and household management for her husband’s publications and on it went from there. Sadly Mrs Beeton died at the young age of 28…I had always imagined she was a Mrs Bridges (Upstairs downstairs) type but no, she was a young house wife who brought help to millions in her book.

Now I have taken it upon myself to try some of the recipes and shall in time introduce them but i’ll start with this one as it is easy, very tasty and just a little bit different for dinner parties.

So gather the ingredients, all are readily available:

Rice pudding rice
Cooking Apples
Muscovado Sugar
Cloves
Muslin Cloth
String
and just follow the instructions.

I have cooked these at least 4 or 5 times and whilst quite filling they go very well with ice Cream.

Christmas Deserts – Apple Snowballs

Bramleys......

This wonderful desert comes from Mrs Beeton’s Book of Household Management Published in 1861 and is guide to all aspects of running a household in the Victorian Era.

Its 2751 entries from tips on how to deal with servants’ pay and children’s health, and above all a wealth of cooking advice, instructions and recipes. It was an immediate best-seller, running to millions of copies within just a few years.

Isabella was born at 24 Milk Street, Cheapside, London. She was sent to school in Heidelbergin Germany and afterward returned to her stepfather’s home in Epsom, not too far from me really…!

On a visit to London, she was introduced to Samuel Orchard Beeton, a publisher of books and popular magazines, they married on 10th July 1856.

Soon after she began to write articles on cooking and household management for her husband’s publications and on it went from there. Sadly Mrs Beeton died at the young age of 28…I had always imagined she was a Mrs Bridges (Upstairs downstairs) type but no, she was a young house wife who brought help to millions in her book.

Now I have taken it upon myself to try some of the recipes and shall in time introduce them but i’ll start with this one as it is easy, very tasty and just a little bit different for dinner parties.

So gather the ingredients, all are readily available:

Rice pudding rice
Cooking Apples
Muscovado Sugar
Cloves
Muslin Cloth
String
and just follow the instructions.

I have cooked these at least 4 or 5 times and whilst quite filling they go very well with ice Cream.