TB…it’s back in the UK…

Royal Sea Bathing Victoria Ward…but did it ever go away?

World TB Day on 24 March commemorates the discovery of the causative agent of tuberculosis by Robert Koch in 1882. It aims to raise global public awareness of TB.

So…is this quote from a Victorian source or Modern Source?

‘Homelessness is a risk factor for TB, but it is also a risk factor for failure to treat and cure TB leading to an increase in suffering and expense, reduced accessibility to services, and a higher risk of community transmission’.

Sadly a modern source. In 2014:

  • There were 6,520 TB cases
  • 39% of cases were in London
  • 72% of cases were among non-UK born people
  • 10% of people with TB had at least one social risk factor for TB (a history of alcohol or drug misuse, homelessness or imprisonment)
  • 30% of people with pulmonary TB waited over four months from onset of symptoms to beginning treatment

Tuberculosis or Consumption as was known was a major disease throughout Victoria’s reign, killing one in four of its sufferers. London had the highest rate of TB admissions (15.3 per 100,000 population), with North Yorkshire and the Humber having the lowest (1.5 per 100,000 population). Among TB’s most famous victims were Emily Brontë, who succumbed to the bacterial infection in 1848, and Florence Nightingale in 1910.

I find it rather shocking that cuts in public finance are taking us back to the awful days of those awful diseases.

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